Designing With the Color Wheel

by Mona Kremin 09/15/2019

You may have seen them, a circle with all the colors of the rainbow and then some. This is what is called a color wheel. You may think what in the world would I need one of those for? Yes, interior designers and artists use them as a tool to make design decisions. The color wheel is also helpful for many other individuals in everyday living situations. Quilters and tailors often use the theory of the color wheel. The color wheel is also handy to those in marketing or anyone putting together presentations.

The Basics

You will find the color wheel has 12 different colors to make a full spectrum. When you break the wheel down, you see three categories: primary, secondary, and tertiary. The primary color category is made up of red, blue, and yellow. Like the most basic of boxes of crayons. All other colors are created out of the primary colors. For example, secondary colors come when you mix any two primary colors. Orange, green, and violet are secondary colors. 

Finally, tertiary colors appear when you combine one primary color with a secondary from one side or another of that primary color on the color wheel. Think of the giant box of crayons: yellow-orange, red-orange, red-violet, blue-violet, blue-green, and yellow-green are tertiary colors. 

Color wheel usage

When using the color wheel, it helps to know what different color combinations there are and how they can be used. There are multiple ways to experiment with how the colors combine with the help of the color wheel. You can have complimentary colors which are located directly across the circle from each other. They are common color patterns you will see such as red and green during the holiday season. This combination is a very strong visual when you see them together. A calming, subtle color combination that you can use is the monochromatic combination. Mono meaning one makes this a mix of different shades of a single color. 

Similar to monochromatic is analogous, meaning the colors are similar or corresponding and you can find these colors next to each other on the wheel. This combination is perhaps the easiest to design with. When you lay a triangle over the wheel, each point will rest on a color that when used together is called a triadic color combination. This combination is one of the most common you can use when designing almost anything.

Next time you drive down your local street take note of the color wheel combinations on the houses, commercial buildings, and signage. Use of complementary color combinations is especially crucial in addressing curb appeal. House and trim colors that clash can be an instant turn off to passersby. If you need help deciphering which colors most accentuate your home's architectural details, seek a design specialist and turn your home into the most exciting house on the street.

About the Author
Author

Mona Kremin

 Experienced Licensed Realtor since 1985 in Great Neck and the North Shore of Long Island. With this experience, Mona has become a local expert, exhibiting exceptional dedication to customer service, bringing key buyers and sellers together.  

After being a consistent multimillion dollar producer, and achieving Top Office Producer in 2000, Mona became the Sales Manager of one of the top offices on the Multiple Listing Service of Long Island. She has been managing agents for the past 17 years as well as providing her customers and clients with exceptional service. Keller Williams Realty is now fortunate to have her on their team. Her expertise has assisted in listing, negotiating and closing hundreds of deals. Her dedication and personal commitment to the profession is exemplified by her untiring work ethic. "Being a Realtor means more than listing and selling homes. It's about people, families, and their hopes and dreams. It's about a relationship based on trust, knowledge and experience. My customers can be assured that I'll always go that extra mile to make their experience the best they have ever had when buying or selling a home." Her best compliment is your referral, and she has had hundreds throughout her career.  

Her professional designations are extensive. She is a Licensed Associate Broker, a Member of the Long Island Board of Realtors, New York Association of Realtors, National Association of Realtors, Senior Real Estate Specialist, and a Certified Buyer Representative. She has been on the Board of Directors of the Long Island Board of Realtors since 2004, and was the President of the Nassau North Shore Chapter from 2008 - 2010. She is now the Recording Secretary.  

Prior to her career in real estate, Mona graduated with honors with a Master of Arts from New York University. She is the past President of the Great Neck Chapter of Hadassah, receiving numerous awards and honors, including Woman of the Year.  

In addition to New York, Mona is now a Licensed Real Estate Salesperson in Florida, and is dually licensed with a Keller Williams office in Boca Raton.